Cessna Citation’s tailplane stalled due to icing on departure from Oslo, report

Cessna Citation’s tailplane stalled due to icing on departure from Oslo, report

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

NTSB issues 10 recommendations after Embraer ERJ-175 pitch control incident

NTSB issues 10 recommendations after Embraer ERJ-175 pitch control incident

Based on preliminary findings from its ongoing investigation of a pitch control incident involving an Embraer ERJ-175 airplane, the NTSB issued 10 safety recommendations.

On November 6, 2019, Republic Airways flight 4439, an Embraer ERJ-175 declared an emergency shortly after takeoff from Atlanta-Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, reporting a pitch trim-related flight control issue and difficulty controlling the airplane. There were six passengers on board the airplane.
The captain and first officer later reported that they both needed to use both hands to counter the airplane’s nose-up pitch motion and that doing so involved such effort that neither felt that they could reach for the QRH to troubleshoot the problem. Ultimately, the flight crew was able to trim the airplane with the first officer’s trim switch, return to Atlanta, and land the airplane safely about 15 minutes after declaring the emergency.

The NTSB issued six safety recommendations to the National Civil Aviation Agency of Brazil (ANAC) and four to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The recommendations are designed to address areas of concern including wire chafing, application of Embraer service bulletins relating to the pitch trim switch, and potential limitations in checklist memory items for pilots to address unintended operation of the pitch trim system.

Although the cause of the incident remains under investigation, post-incident examination of the airplane revealed chafed insulation around wires connecting the horizontal stabilizer actuator control electronics to the captain’s pitch trim switch and autopilot/trim disconnect button. The chafing was caused by contact with the incorrectly untucked pigtail of the forward mechanical stop bolt safety wire.

When the captain’s pitch trim switch was removed from the yoke, marks were observed that indicated at some point before the incident flight, the pitch trim switch had been installed in an inverted position. Embraer previously issued three service bulletins related to pitch trim switch installation error following reports from flight crews in 2015 about flight control system difficulties. However, neither the FAA nor the ANAC required incorporation of the service bulletins. While it is not yet known if inverted switch installation was a factor in the incident, the NTSB is concerned the condition could lead to flight crew confusion, delaying appropriate recognition of and response to increased control forces.

Preliminary information from the NTSB’s investigation also suggests that unintended pitch trim operation may be masked and go undetected during certain phases of flight, such as during takeoff. Further, limitations in the checklist memory items may delay pilots in properly responding to and regaining control of the Embraer ERJ-170/175/190/195 and Lineage 1000 series airplanes. The NTSB is concerned the crew’s application of the memory item(s) on the ERJ-175 Pitch Trim Runaway checklist may not comprehensively address circumstances of the trim system operation in a timely manner.

More information:

Wire chafing to the insulation around wires connecting the horizontal stabilizer actuator control electronics to the captain’s pitch trim switch in an Embraer-175 (left) and an incorrectly untucked pigtail (right) that caused the chafing. Photo courtesy of Republic Airways.

The post NTSB issues 10 recommendations after Embraer ERJ-175 pitch control incident appeared first on ASN News.

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

EASA updated its recommendations of overflights of Iran and Iraq

EASA updated its recommendations of overflights of Iran and Iraq

EASA has re-evaluated their recommendations on flying over Iran and Iraq.
The Integrated EU Aviation Security Risk Assessment Group met on 28 January 2020 to assess the most recent information related to the safety and security of commercial air transport over Iran and Iraq. As an outcome of this meeting, the temporary recommendations issued by EASA and the EC Commission on 8 January 2020, recommending avoidance of all overflights of Iraq as a precautionary measure, and on 1 January 2020,  recommending avoidance of all overflights of Iran as a precautionary measure, have been withdrawn.

On the basis of the latest information, the Group reaffirmed the position stated in the current published Conflict Zone Information Bulletins (CZIB) for overflights of Iran and Iraq airspace. CZIB-2017-04R5 for Iraq advises airlines to avoid overflights of Iraq except in two specific air corridors. CZIB-2020-01R0 for Iran advises against overflights of Iran at levels below 25,000 feet.

 

The post EASA updated its recommendations of overflights of Iran and Iraq appeared first on ASN News.

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

FAA further extends allowed operations in Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman airspace

FAA further extends allowed operations in Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman airspace

The U.S. FAA has extended the allowed operations in Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman airspace, following a flight ban issued on January 8 and updated on January 10 and January 16.

Kuwait was added to the list of airports to/from which U.S. aircraft are allowed to operate. Additionally, operations may be conducted into and out of following airports in Saudi Arabia for which arrivals and departures may necessitate operations in the overwater airspace above the Persian Gulf: Ras Mishab (OERM), Jubail (OEJB), Dammam-King Fahd International (OEDF), Al Ahsa (OEAH), Batha (OEBT), Tanajib (OETN), And Ras Tanura (OERT).
Operations in restricted military areas established by Saudi Arabia, and arriving/departing from the above airports, with clearance from the appropriate authorities of Saudi Arabia are also allowed.

More information:

The post FAA further extends allowed operations in Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman airspace appeared first on ASN News.

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

Report: Finnish Learjet 35A missed drone by 60 meters during low flying exercise

Report: Finnish Learjet 35A missed drone by 60 meters during low flying exercise

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

Caspian Airlines MD-83 suffers runway excursion after landing at Bandar Mahshahr Airport, Iran

Caspian Airlines MD-83 suffers runway excursion after landing at Bandar Mahshahr Airport, Iran

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

Lockheed C-130 Hercules crashed near Cooma, Australia while fighting a fire

Lockheed C-130 Hercules crashed near Cooma, Australia while fighting a fire

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

South African CAA’s Cessna Citation crashed near George Airport, killing all three on board

South African CAA’s Cessna Citation crashed near George Airport, killing all three on board

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

Kazakhstan extends suspension of Bek Air’s AOC over safety issues

Kazakhstan extends suspension of Bek Air’s AOC over safety issues

The Kazakhstan Aviation Administration extended the suspension of Bek Air’s Air Operator Certificate after it found several safety issues during an inspection at the airline following a fatal accident.

On December 27, 2019, a Fokker 100 of Bek Air crashed on takeoff from Almaty Airport, killing twelve. The aviation authorities proceeded to suspend the carrier’s AOC after this accident and initiated an inspection.

The authorities reported details of their findings, that led them to extend the suspension. Among others, the authorities noted issues with the tracking and record keeping of parts. For instance, serial numbers were removed from engines, making it impossible to verify the compliance of the engines, as well as to confirm the actual number of hours and cycles.
Also, flight crew training records were found to be incomplete and in some cases their authenticity was called into question.
With regards to the recent accident, the authorities state that CCTV evidence shows that no tactile inspection of the wings was carried out prior to departure.  This is a necessary check to determine the presence of ice on the wings.

If the violations are not remedied within 6 months, the AOC and the airworthiness certificates will be revoked.

The airline, in turn, issued a statement, responding to all issues raised by the authorities. For example, Bek Air states that id plates were removed that were “weakly attached” to important and expensive units (usually engines) and stored in the office of the aviation engineering team.

 

The post Kazakhstan extends suspension of Bek Air’s AOC over safety issues appeared first on ASN News.

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

Report: Runway incursion by snowplow proceeding through holding position onto active Montreal runway

Report: Runway incursion by snowplow proceeding through holding position onto active Montreal runway

 The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) released its investigation report on an incident in which four snow-removal vehicles entered an active runway at Montréal/Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport as an aircraft was preparing to land.

On 2 February 2019, snow-removal operations were being conducted at the airport. A convoy of 7 vehicles was instructed to proceed from runway 24R to holding bay 24L. At the same time, a Bombardier CRJ-200 operated by SkyWest Airlines was flying the instrument landing system approach and had been cleared to land on runway 24L. A runway incursion occurred at 11:19 local time when the lead vehicle in the convoy, a snowplow-sweeper, crossed the runway holding position and continued onto the runway. The flight crew initiated a go-around, flying over the lead vehicle in the convoy, which had been followed by three additional snowplow-sweepers. The aircraft landed safely about 15 minutes later. The convoy subsequently regrouped and completed the snow-removal operations. There were no injuries or damage.

The TSB has identified a series of causes and contributing factors in this runway incursion. The investigation found that the convoy lead, focused on the tasks of driving, snow removal, and planning the next snow-removal pass, missed the runway holding position lighting, signage, and markings, forgot about the requirement to hold short, and proceeded onto runway 24L. Three other vehicles in the convoy followed the lead vehicle and passed the runway holding position, which increased the severity of the incursion. The ground controller on duty was multitasking and conducting an operational phone call, which led to a breakdown of his scanning and monitoring, delayed his response, and increased the incursion’s severity.

The investigation also found that if vehicle operator training does not include runway incursion scenarios, convoy operators may not be sufficiently prepared to take necessary safety actions to reduce the associated risks. Further, air traffic control instructions that direct ground vehicles to runways and do not contain explicit instruction to hold short of an active runway can increase the potential for misunderstanding, and increase the risk of an incursion.

Following the occurrence, Aéroports de Montréal (ADM) held meetings to raise awareness  of runway incursions, and to obtain employee feedback on the occurrence. An internal investigation within the ADM safety management system was conducted, including brainstorming/mapping and a risk analysis of the event. ADM modified procedures and employee training, and has added the issue of runway incursions to the agenda for its next meeting with NAV CANADA’s Runway Safety Action Team.

The post Report: Runway incursion by snowplow proceeding through holding position onto active Montreal runway appeared first on ASN News.

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article