EASA extends validity of conflict zone warnings for Sinai and Yemen to 30 March 2020

EASA extends validity of conflict zone warnings for Sinai and Yemen to 30 March 2020

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula and Yemen to 30 March 2020.

 

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Russia concludes Flydubai B737-800 accident investigation

Russia concludes Flydubai B737-800 accident investigation

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Proflight DHC-8-300 damaged in hail storm near Lusaka, Zambia

Proflight DHC-8-300 damaged in hail storm near Lusaka, Zambia

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Busy Bee Congo Dornier 228 crashes after takeoff from Goma

Busy Bee Congo Dornier 228 crashes after takeoff from Goma

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Avior Boeing 737-400 suffers gear collapse on landing at Bogotá Airport, Colombia

Avior Boeing 737-400 suffers gear collapse on landing at Bogotá Airport, Colombia

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Turkish Airlines Boeing 737-800 suffers runway excursion after landing at Odessa, Ukraine

Turkish Airlines Boeing 737-800 suffers runway excursion after landing at Odessa, Ukraine

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NTSB: fan blade failure cascaded into cowl failure and loss of cabin pressure on Southwest Flight 1380

NTSB: fan blade failure cascaded into cowl failure and loss of cabin pressure on Southwest Flight 1380

The U.S. NTSB determined that a fractured fan blade from a CFM-56-7B engine, on a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-700, led to the engine inlet and fan cowl separating and subsequently damaging the fuselage, resulting in a rapid cabin depressurization.

One passenger died and eight others suffered minor injuries on April 17, 2018, when the fractured fan blade impacted the fan case, causing fan cowl fragments to strike the airplane’s fuselage near a cabin window. The window departed the airplane, and the cabin rapidly depressurized. The accident happened after Southwest Airlines flight 1380 departed New York’s LaGuardia Airport, bound for Love Field, Dallas, Texas. The flight crew conducted an emergency descent and diverted to Philadelphia International Airport. There were 144 passengers and five crew members aboard.

The NTSB noted, as part of its probable cause, the accident occurred when portions of the fan cowl separated in flight after a fan blade, which had fractured due to a fatigue crack, impacted the engine fan case at a location that was critical to the structural integrity and performance of the fan cowl structure. The NTSB found that the separated fan blade impacted the engine fan case and fractured into multiple fragments. Some of the fragments traveled forward of the engine and into the inlet. The impact of the separated fan blade with the fan case also imparted significant loads into the fan cowl through the radial restraint fitting, which is what caused the fan cowl to fail.

As a result of the investigation, the NTSB issued seven new safety recommendations. These recommendations address the need to ensure the structural integrity of the fan cowl on Boeing 737 next-generation airplanes and assess whether other airframe and engine combinations have critical fan blade impact locations, the importance of having flight attendants secured in a jumpseat during emergency landings, and guidance for mitigating hazards to passengers affected by an in-flight loss of seating capacity.

More information:

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Air Peace failed to report a serious hard landing incident of a Boeing 737-300 in May 2019

Air Peace failed to report a serious hard landing incident of a Boeing 737-300 in May 2019

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Study: pilots have difficulty detecting drones on final appraoach

Study: pilots have difficulty detecting drones on final appraoach

Researchers from the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Oklahoma State University have conducted a study on the ability of pilots to visually detect small unmanned aircraft on final approach.

In 2018, the FAA received 2,307 reports of pilots having observed unmanned aircraft (UAS), with 22.8% (n = 526) occurring during the final approach phase of flight.  Pilots are forced to rely on visual senses and scanning techniques to ensure the approach path remains clear of UAS incursions. The research evaluated the effectiveness of pilot visual detection of a multirotor UAS during five approach to landing scenarios in which an unmanned aircraft created an incursion into the approach path. During the scripted approach scenarios, the UAS either remained stationary or maneuvered laterally.  Both aircraft and UAS were separated by established vertical safety margins and protocols to avoid an actual collision.
Overall, participants detected the UAS during 30% of the approaches. The static UAS was only detected during 13.6% of the approaches, at a mean range of 647 ft (197 m). The detection rate improved to 50% when the drone was in motion, with a mean detection range of 1,593 ft (485 m).
Vector data was calculated to determine the detection angle of UAS sightings, with the majority of successful detections occurring within 5˚ laterally and 10˚ vertically of center.
The study emphasized that based on the recorded detection distance, pilots would only have a limited margin of error to successfully execute evasive maneuvers, based on the FAA’s Recommended Minimum Reaction Time Required for Evasion criteria.

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Transaviaexport Airlines passes IATA safety audit

Transaviaexport Airlines passes IATA safety audit

Transaviaexport Airlines passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Transaviaexport Airlines is a Belarus cargo airline. It started operating flights in 1992 and currently operates one Boeing 747-300F and five Ilyushin IL-76TD cargo aircraft.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

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Transaviaaxport IL-76; photo: Konstantin von Wedelstaedt

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