Canada issues Emergency AD to limit Airbus A220 engine power settings after recent incidents

Canada issues Emergency AD to limit Airbus A220 engine power settings after recent incidents

Regulator Transport Canada issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive (AD) to limit certain engine power settings on Airbus A220 aircraft following three recent failures.

Three inflight shutdowns occurred within three months time: July 25, 2019, September 16, 2019, and October 15, 2019. In all cases, the aircraft involved was a Swiss International Air Lines Airbus A220-300 (formerly named Bombardier CSeries 300) with Pratt & Whitney PW1524G-3 engines. These inflight shutdowns were due to failure of the low-pressure compressor (LPC) stage 1 rotor, which resulted in the rotor disk releasing from the LPC case and damaging the engine.

Investigations are ongoing to determine the root cause., but preliminary investigation results indicate high altitude climbs at higher thrust settings for engines with certain thrust ratings may be a contributor. This condition, if not corrected, could lead to an uncontained failure of the engine and damage to the aeroplane.
Transport Canada issued the AD on October 26, introducing a new Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) limitation and normal procedure to limit the engine N1 setting to 94% while above 29000 feet. This AD is considered an interim action and further AD action may follow.

 

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Qeshm Air passes IATA safety audit

Qeshm Air passes IATA safety audit

Qeshm Air passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

Qeshm Air is an Iranian airline. It started operating flights in 1996 and currently operates four Airbus A300B4-605Rs; three Airbus A320-200s; four Avro RJs; four Fokker 100s and four Fokker 50s.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

 

A Qeshm Air Airbus A300B4-600R (photo: Dmitry Terekhov / CC:by-sa)

A Qeshm Air Airbus A300B4-600R (photo: Dmitry Terekhov / CC:by-sa)

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A Let L-410UVP crashed in South Sudan on a flight from Juba to Bor

A Let L-410UVP crashed in South Sudan on a flight from Juba to Bor

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FAA revokes certificate of maintenance firm that delivered faulty 737 MAX AOA sensor to Lion Air

FAA revokes certificate of maintenance firm that delivered faulty 737 MAX AOA sensor to Lion Air

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an order on October 25, 2019, revoking the repair station certificate of Xtra Aerospace, LLC, of Miramar, Florida.

According to the order, Xtra failed to comply with requirements to repair only aircraft parts on its list of parts acceptable to the FAA that it was capable of repairing. The company also failed to comply with procedures in its repair station manual for implementing a capability list in accordance with the Federal Aviation Regulations. Xtra is a repair station certificated under part 145 of the Federal Aviation Regulations.

The FAA began its investigation in November 2018. Investigators looked specifically at the company’s compliance with regulatory requirements that apply to its capability list, and records and work orders for aircraft parts it approved for return to service. The investigation determined that from November 2009 until May 2019, Xtra failed to complete and retain records in accordance with procedures in its repair station manual to support parts on its capability list. The company also did not substantiate that it had adequate facilities, tools, test equipment, technical publications, and trained and qualified employees to repair parts on its capability list.

The agency issued the order as part of a settlement agreement with the company. Under the agreement, Xtra waives its right to appeal the revocation to the National Transportation Safety Board or any court.

On the same day the order was issued, the Indonesian NTSC investigators published their final report on the Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX crash. It was concluded that MCAS activation on a previous flight was caused by faulty repair and calibration of an AOA sensor by Xtra Aerospace.  This led the NTSC to issue a safety recommendation to the FAA: “The absence of equivalency assessment required by Xtra Aerospace procedure and unavailability of procedure was not detected by the FAA. This indicated inadequacy of the FAA oversight. Therefore, NTSC recommends that the FAA improves the oversight to Approved Maintenance Organization (AMO) to ensure the processes within the AMO are conducted in accordance with the requirements.”

 

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Indonesia published final report on the Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX JT610 accident

Indonesia published final report on the Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX JT610 accident

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FAA issues emergency AD on GE90-115B turbofan engines following uncontained failure incident

FAA issues emergency AD on GE90-115B turbofan engines following uncontained failure incident

The FAA issued an emergency Airworthiness Directive (AD), ordering the removal of a seal from certain General Electric GE90-115B turbofan engines.

The emergency AD was prompted by an incident that occurred on October 20, 2019, in which a Thai Airways Boeing 777-300ER airplane powered by GE GE90-115B turbofan engines experienced an uncontained high-pressure turbine (HPT) failure that resulted in an aborted takeoff. Debris impacted the aircraft fuselage and the other engine.

The AD calls for the removal from service of the Interstage Seal of certain GE GE90-115B turbofan engines, within 25 flight cycles.

 

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Uncoordinated asymmetric braking causes CSeries 300 temporary runway excursion at Riga, Latvia

Uncoordinated asymmetric braking causes CSeries 300 temporary runway excursion at Riga, Latvia

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Report of easyJet birdstrike accident at Murcia, Spain, not to be published

Report of easyJet birdstrike accident at Murcia, Spain, not to be published

Spanish investigators have finished the investigation into a bird strike accident at Murcia, but will not publish the final report because the accident happened at an airport owned by the air force.

The accident occurred on March 27, 2018, when an easyJet Airbus A319 aborted the takeoff at Murcia-San Javier Airport, Spain, after suffering a bird strike. Birds (reportedly seagulls) were ingested in both engines. Since Murcia Airport is owned by the Spanish Air Force, a joint civil-military investigation was carried out by the CIAIAC (civil) and CITAAM (military).

The CIAIAC reported on its website that the investigation has been completed, however: “taking into account the characteristics of the treatment of information in the military field and the obligations to inform the parties in the civilian field, it has been agreed that the publication and public dissemination of the Final Report will be restricted.”

 

EasyJet Airbus A319 G-EZMK (photo: Anna Zvereva / CC:by-sa)

EasyJet Airbus A319 G-EZMK (photo: Anna Zvereva / CC:by-sa)

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PenAir Saab 2000 suffers runway excursion on landing at Unalaska Airport

PenAir Saab 2000 suffers runway excursion on landing at Unalaska Airport

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ASL Airlines France passes IATA safety audit

ASL Airlines France passes IATA safety audit

ASL Airlines France passed the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).

ASL Airlines France is the French subsidiary of the ASL Aviation Group. It operated as Europe Airpost until being rebranded by ASL in 2015. The airline currently uses five Boeing 737-300s; six Boeing 737-400s; six Boeing 737-700s and 2 Boeing 737-800s.

The IOSA programme is an evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised quality audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. It was created in 2003 by IATA.  All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership.

More information:

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