Aileron cable reversal eyed in Air Astana ERJ-190 serious loss of control accident, Portugal

Aileron cable reversal eyed in Air Astana ERJ-190 serious loss of control accident, Portugal

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Report: Boeing 737 touched down as an A320 had just left the ground at Edinburgh

Report: Boeing 737 touched down as an A320 had just left the ground at Edinburgh

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ATSB issues recommendations for improved aircraft design tolerance to inadvertent dual control inputs

ATSB issues recommendations for improved aircraft design tolerance to inadvertent dual control inputs

The ATSB has issued Safety Recommendations to EASA and aircraft manufacturer ATR seeking improved aircraft system design tolerance to inadvertent dual control inputs by pilots.

The Safety Recommendations are contained in the ATSB’s final investigation report into an inflight upset and inadvertent pitch disconnect experienced by an ATR 72 turboprop airliner on a flight from Canberra to Sydney, Australia, in 2014.

During that flight, as a result of a sudden decrease in tailwind, the ATR’s pilots unintentionally applied opposing control inputs to their control columns while trying to ensure the aircraft remained below its maximum operating speed. These differential forces activated the aircraft’s pitch uncoupling mechanism. Intended for activation in the event of one of the aircraft elevators being jammed, the pitch uncoupling mechanism resulted in a pitch disconnect, where the elevators could operate independently of each other.

With the pilots applying opposing control inputs and built-up tension within the flight control system, the pitch disconnect resulted in transient asymmetric elevator deflections, generating aerodynamic loads that exceeded the strength of the horizontal stabiliser, causing significant damage.
The aircraft landed safely and was inspected by maintenance engineers but the damage was not detected. The aircraft returned to service and operated a further 13 flights before a subsequent inspection after a suspected birdstrike found it had sustained serious structural damage to its horizontal stabiliser, which was subsequently replaced.

As part of its final report, the ATSB has issued a Safety Recommendation to EASA, recommending taking “further action to review the current design standard (CS-25) in consideration of effect that dual control inputs may have on control of aircraft.”

In addition, the ATSB has issued two Safety Recommendations to aircraft manufacturer ATR, recommending that ATR:

  • assess the operational risk associated with limited tactile feedback between left and right control columns in the context of no visual or auditory systems to indicate dual control inputs; and
  • perform a detailed review of the effects of dual control inputs on the aircraft’s longitudinal handling qualities and control dynamics to determine if there are any detrimental effects that could lead to difficulty in controlling the aircraft throughout the approved flight envelope and operational range.

 

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Superjet in fatal Moscow crash had windshear warning on approach and bounced twice on landing

Superjet in fatal Moscow crash had windshear warning on approach and bounced twice on landing

SU-95

The Russian Ministry of Transport released initial findings on the May 5 accident of a Sukhoi Superjet at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport in Russia.

Aeroflot flight 1492 took off from Sheremetyevo Airport’s runway 24C at 18:03 hours local time on a scheduled service to Murmansk, Russia. Visibility was fine but there were some Cumulonimbus clouds near the airfield at 6000 feet.
The flight crew engaged the autopilot as the aircraft climbed through a height of 700 ft (215 m). At 18:08, as the aircraft was climbing through an altitude of about 8900 ft (2700 m), a failure occurred in the electrical system. At this point, the aircraft was 30 km west-northwest of the airport in an area of thunderstorm activity.
The captain assumed manual control of the aircraft and the crew managed to establish radio contact using UHF. The flight was not able to contact the approach controller and subsequently selected the emergency transponder code 7600 (loss of radio communication).
About 18:17 the aircraft overshot the runway centreline after turning to runway heading. Altitude at that time was about 2400 feet. The aircraft continued the right-hand turn, completed a circle and proceeded on the final approach for runway 24L. Flaps were selected at 25°, which was the recommended setting for landing above maximum landing weight.
At 18:26 the flight crew selected the emergency transponder code 7700 (emergency).
When descending from 335 to 275 m (1100-900 ft) the windshear warning system sounded five times: “Go around. Windshear ahead”.
From a height of 80 m (260 ft) above ground level, the aircraft descended below the glide path and at a height of 55 m (180 ft) the TAWS warning sounded: “Glide Slope.” From that moment on the airspeed increased to 170 knots.
At 18:30 the aircraft overflew the runway threshold and touched down at a distance of 900 m past the threshold at a speed of 158 knots. Touchdown occurred at a g-force of at least 2.55g with a subsequent bounce to a height of about 2 m. After two seconds the aircraft landed again on the nose landing gear with a vertical load 5.85g, and bounced to a height of 6 m. The third landing of the aircraft occurred at a speed of 140 knots with a vertical overload of at least 5g. This caused a rupture of the wing structure and fuel lines. Flames erupted and engulfed the rear of the aircraft. The aircraft slid to a stop on the grass between runway 24L and two taxiways. An emergency evacuation was then carried out while flames quickly engulfed the rear fuselage.

 

 

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Cessna Citation Encore crashes off Florida after losing communication

Cessna Citation Encore crashes off Florida after losing communication

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EASA extends validity of conflict zone warnings for Sinai and Yemen

EASA extends validity of conflict zone warnings for Sinai and Yemen

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletins for Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula and Yemen.

 

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Cessna Citation crashed near Indianapolis Regional Airport, killing two

Cessna Citation crashed near Indianapolis Regional Airport, killing two

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Report: Brazilian Cessna Citation VII loss of control accident after pitch trim failure

Report: Brazilian Cessna Citation VII loss of control accident after pitch trim failure

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Cuba: Crash of Global Air Boeing 737-200 at Havana due to errors in weight and balance calculations

Cuba: Crash of Global Air Boeing 737-200 at Havana due to errors in weight and balance calculations

The Instituto de la Aeronáutica Civil de Cuba (IACC) reported that it had completed their investigation into the May 2018 accident involving a Global Air Boeing 737-200, citing errors in weight an balance calculations.

The Global Air Boeing 737-200, operating on Cubana de Aviación flight 972 from Havana to Holguín, Cuba, crashed shortly after takeoff on May 18. 2018. The aircraft came down in vegetation near a railway outside the airport, broke up and burst into flames. There were 107 passengers on board along with six Mexican crew members. One passenger survived the accident.

On May 16, the Instituto de la Aeronáutica Civil de Cuba (IACC) reported that it had completed their investigation. The authorities did not share any details and just reported that the probable cause of the accident “were the actions of the crew and their errors in the weight and balance calculations, which led to the loss of control and collapse of the aircraft during the takeoff stage”

A Global Air official earlier had reported that the aircraft had attained an extreme nose-up attitude during takeoff, which would suggest the centre of gravity was aft of the aircraft’s limits.

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FAA issues warning for airspace above the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman

FAA issues warning for airspace above the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman

The FAA issued a warning to U.S. civil pilots to ‘exercise caution’ when operating in the airspace above the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman due to tensions in the region.

Iran has publicly made threats to U.S. military operations in the Gulf region. In addition, the FAA states that Iran possesses a wide variety of anti-aircraft-capable weapons, including surface-to-air missile systems (SAMs), man-portable air defense systems (MANPADS) and fighter aircraft that are capable of conducting aircraft interception operations. Some of the anti-aircraft-capable
weapons have ranges that encompass key international air routes over the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. Additionally, Iran recently conducted a military exercise in the region,
demonstrating their unmanned aircraft system (UAS) capabilities.
The FAA continues that although Iran likely has no intention to target civil aircraft, the presence of multiple long-range, advanced anti-aircraft capable weapons in a tense environment poses a possible risk of miscalculation or misidentification, especially during periods of heightened political tension and rhetoric.
There is also the potential for Iran to increase their use of Global Positioning System (GPS) jammers and other communication jamming capabilities, which may affect U.S. civil aviation operating in overwater airspace over the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman.

More information:
Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) KICZ A0015/19

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