Embraer Phenom 100 jet saved by EMAS in overrun incident at Kansas City-Downtown Airport, USA

Embraer Phenom 100 jet saved by EMAS in overrun incident at Kansas City-Downtown Airport, USA

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List of aircraft safely stopped by EMAS during runway overrun incidents

List of aircraft safely stopped by EMAS during runway overrun incidents

EMAS

An engineered materials arresting system (EMAS), or arrester bed, is an area at the end of a runway that is created to reduce the severity of the consequences of a runway excursion. The purpose of an EMAS is to stop an aircraft overrun with no human injury and minimal aircraft damage. The aircraft is slowed by the loss of energy required to crush the EMAS material, which usually consists of lightweight, crushable concrete blocks.

The EMAS is predominantly used in the United States. It is installed at 106+ runway ends at 63+ airports, according to the FAA.

List of aircraft safely stopped by EMAS

8 May 1999
A Saab 340 commuter aircraft overran the runway at New York-JFK Airport, NY (30 on board)

30 May 2003
A Gemini Cargo MD-11 overran the runway at New York-JFK Airport, NY (3 on board)

22 January 2005
A Boeing 747 overran the runway at New York-JFK Airport, NY (3 on board)

17 July 2006
A Dassault Falcon 900 overran the runway at Greenville Downtown Airport, SC (5 on board)

19 July 2008
An Airbus A320 overran the runway at Chicago O’Hare Airport, IL (145 on board)

19 January 2010
A CRJ-200 regional jet overran the runway at Charleston-Yeager Airport, WV (34 on board)

1 October 2010
A Gulfstream IV overran the runway at Teterboro Airport, NJ (10 on board)

3 November 2011
A Cessna Citation II overran the runway at Key West International Airport, FL (5 on board)

27 October 2013
A Cessna 680 Citation overran the runway at Palm Beach International, FL (8 on board)

26 January 2016
A Dassault Falcon 20 overran the runway at Chicago Executive Airport, IL (2 on board)

27 October 2016
A Boeing 737-700 overran the runway at New York-LaGuardia Airport, NY (37 on board)

30 April 2017
A Cessna 750 Citation overran the runway at Burbank Airport, CA (2 on board)

4 February 2018
A Beechjet 400A overran the runway at Burke Lakefront Airport in Cleveland, OH (4 on board)

6 December 2018
A Boeing 737-700 overran the runway at Hollywood Burbank Airport, CA (117 on board)

27 February 2019
A Phenom 100 overran the runway at Downtown Airport in Kansas City, MO

Cessna 550 Citation II overran into the EMAS at Key West International Airport in 2011

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Report: Aeroméxico ERJ-190 accident at Durango due to windshear; unqualified pilots at the controls

Report: Aeroméxico ERJ-190 accident at Durango due to windshear; unqualified pilots at the controls

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NTSB: both engines failed in fatal Convair C-131 ditching off Miami

NTSB: both engines failed in fatal Convair C-131 ditching off Miami

The NTSB issued a preliminary report on the February 8, 2019, ditching of a Convair C-131B cargo plane off Miami, Florida, stating both engines failed.

The report says the left engine propeller control could not be adjusted during the first leg from Opa-locka to Nassau, Bahamas.  The power was stuck at 2400 prm.

During preparations for the return leg to Opa-locka, the left propeller control had re-set itself.  After reaching cruising altitude the left prop control again failed at 2400 rpm. During the descent the the right engine suddenly backfired and began to surge. The flight crew feathered the propeller and shut down the engine. Shortly afterwards the left engine also backfired and began to surge. Altitude could not be maintained and a ditching was carried out. The captain was fatally injured, and the first officer was seriously injured.

More info:

 

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Bangladesh Biman Boeing 737-800 hijacked on Dhaka-Chittagong flight

Bangladesh Biman Boeing 737-800 hijacked on Dhaka-Chittagong flight

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Atlas Air Boeing 767-300, operating for Amazon Prime Air, crashed near Houston, Texas, USA

Atlas Air Boeing 767-300, operating for Amazon Prime Air, crashed near Houston, Texas, USA

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FAA warns pilots for risks of flying in Venezuelan airspace

FAA warns pilots for risks of flying in Venezuelan airspace

Due to ongoing political instability and increasing tensions in Venezuela, the U.S. FAA assesses there is an increasing inadvertent risk to U.S. civil aviation operating into, out of, within or over the
territory and airspace of Venezuela at altitudes below Flight Level (FL) 260. As a result, on 22 February 2019, the FAA published Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) KICZ A0001/19, advising U.S. civil
aviation to exercise caution during flight operations into, out of, within or over the territory and airspace of Venezuela at altitudes below FL260.

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Dutch Safety Board: better handling of overflying conflict zones by airline industry since MH17

Dutch Safety Board: better handling of overflying conflict zones by airline industry since MH17

Worldwide, airlines are handling the risks associated with overflying conflict zones more deliberately, according to a report published by the Dutch Safety Board. The Board investigated the level of implementation of their recommendations on the MH17 crash investigation.

Since the crash of MH17, the issue has been incorporated into the international Standards and Recommended Practices, manuals and management systems of aviation organisations, including ICAO and IATA, the Safety Board states. Manuals have been published that devote specific attention to overflying conflict zones. In addition, more and more accurate information on conflict zones is now available for States and airlines to incorporate into their risk assessment operations.

Aviation safety
The investigation shows that a range of measures has been implemented. However, the effect on flight safety is difficult to measure. States and airlines around the world are aware of the issue at stake and devote more attention to it. Stakeholders no longer assume that open airspace over a conflict zone actually guarantees safe passage. Airlines are taking a more structured approach to analysing the risks and uncertainties, scaling up to a higher risk level at an earlier stage. Some airlines state that they now decide more quickly to refrain from overflying specific areas if no clear information relating to such areas is available.

Information on conflict zones
Progress has also been made on sharing threat-related information. For instance, the European Commission now organises meetings with representatives of EU member states and relevant EU bodies to analyse, on the basis of consolidated information from the intelligence services, the risk levels for overflying specific areas. Areas classified as ‘high-risk zones’ during the meeting are listed in a ‘Conflict Zone Information Bulletin’ that is published by EASA and made available to airlines and passengers worldwide. ‘Rapid Alerts’ can be deployed to instantly share information about suddenly escalating situations. This is how the EU member states collaborate to provide more adequate insight into the risks on a global scale.

In the Netherlands, a special agreement has been established that ensures the exchange of threat information between the Dutch government and Dutch airlines. There are meetings to discuss non-public threat information. These activities have resulted in a network, which ensures that information can be exchanged quickly in urgent cases, too. Moreover, Dutch airlines can turn to a dedicated information desk established by the Dutch intelligence services if they have specific questions.

Risk assessment
Airlines around the world have stated that they have become more aware of the risks of overflying conflict zones since the crash of flight MH17. Many airlines now make a more active effort to gather accurate information and are more willing to share it with other airlines. There are States, such as the United States, United Kingdom, France and Germany, that provide information and/or advice to national airlines, or even impose a ban on overflying specific conflict zones. That information is published to make it accessible to other airlines as well. In combination with the EASA bulletins and any information provided by (commercial) agencies, airlines now have access to more and generally more accurate information for their risk assessment operations.

Areas of concern
The follow-up investigation shows that important steps have been taken in recent years to control the risks associated with flying over conflict zones more effectively. It is essential for changes already implemented to be consolidated and for stakeholders to carry through with the subsequent steps they have announced. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed by nations and airlines. The investigators found that very few changes relating to airspace management by nations dealing with armed conflict within their territories have been made. Also, airlines require more detailed and complex information to perform adequate risk assessments. Information on suddenly escalating and/or new conflicts is another area of continued concern. In this context, the willingness and trust to actively inform other parties about (potential) threats are vital, something that does not come naturally in every region of the world.

More information: 

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Report: Iran ATR-72 descended below MSA and hit terrain after being caught in mountain wave

Report: Iran ATR-72 descended below MSA and hit terrain after being caught in mountain wave

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Study: Analysis of wake turbulence occurrences at Sydney Airport

Study: Analysis of wake turbulence occurrences at Sydney Airport

The ATSB advises flight crews of the increased likelihood of encountering wake turbulence when on approach to Sydney Airport.

An ATSB analysis has concluded there is a disproportionate rate of pilot reported wake turbulence occurrences for aircraft arriving at Sydney Airport compared to other major Australian airports.

Sydney Airport is the only major Australian airport currently with parallel runways. The distance between these runways is such that they are treated as individual runways and do not require the application of the wake turbulence separation standard by air traffic control for aircraft operating to a single runway. None of the wake turbulence occurrences involved a breach of the separation standard.

More than half of the wake turbulence occurrences during arrival at Sydney Airport were associated with one or more of three factors: high arrival densities across the parallel runway; wind blowing across the parallel runways from the longer to the shorter runway, especially when a heavy or super heavy aircraft was arriving on longer runway; and arrivals following an Airbus A380. The ATSB advises flight crews of the increased likelihood of encountering wake turbulence when on approach to Sydney Airport, particularly in peak periods, when operating on Runway 34 Right with the wind coming from the west or north-west, and/or when following an Airbus A380.

The ATSB has issued a Safety Recommendation to Airservices Australia to introduce measures to reduce the frequency of wake turbulence occurrence at the airport.

Sydney Airport runway 34L and 34R

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