TSB Canada: Toronto runway incursions due to uncommon taxiway layout between parallel runways

TSB Canada: Toronto runway incursions due to uncommon taxiway layout between parallel runways

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) published its report of the investigation into 27 runway incursions that occurred between two closely spaced parallel runways at Toronto/Lester B. Pearson International Airport, Canada, between June 2012 and November 2017.

The investigation found that all the incursions happened on the inner runway (24R), after the flight crews involved had landed on the outer runway (24L) and were taxiing on a rapid-exit taxiway between the two runways. Several characteristics of the rapid exits in this area, known locally as the “south complex,” are different from almost every other major airport in North America. The exits lead directly to the “inner” parallel runway, the hold lines are located immediately following a 65-degree curve and, most notably, they are farther away from the protected runway than is commonly seen elsewhere. These uncommon features mean that the hold lines are not where crews are expecting to see them.

It was also determined that, although flight crews were aware of the increased risk for runway incursions in the area because they are designated as “hot spots” on the airport charts, that guidance did not bring crews’ attention to specific strategies to mitigate the risk of incursion. Instead, crews followed their standard operating procedures and initiated their post-landing actions immediately after exiting the runway, taking their attention away from other more critical tasks – such as identifying the hold line. The timing of those tasks distracted the crew at a point when limited time was available to recognize the visual cues requiring them to stop, and contributed to their overlooking those cues.

The TSB made four recommendations to make these runways safer. The first one is that NAV CANADA amend its phraseology guidance so that safety-critical transmissions are more compelling to flight crews in order for crews to take the safest course of action. The next two recommendations are for Transport Canada and the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to work with operators to amend standard operating procedures so that crews only commence post-landing checks after a landing aircraft has cleared all active runways. Finally, the Board recommends that the Greater Toronto Airports Authority make physical changes to the taxiway layout at Pearson International’s south complex to address the risk of incursions between the parallel runways.

More info:

The post TSB Canada: Toronto runway incursions due to uncommon taxiway layout between parallel runways appeared first on ASN News.

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

Air India Airbus A321 suffers serious FOD on takeoff from Tirupati Airport, India

Air India Airbus A321 suffers serious FOD on takeoff from Tirupati Airport, India

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

Fatal Kathmandu DHC-8 accident caused by stressed-out pilot making unsafe and desperate landing

Fatal Kathmandu DHC-8 accident caused by stressed-out pilot making unsafe and desperate landing

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

South African Airways stops flights to Blantyre, Malawi due to safety concerns

South African Airways stops flights to Blantyre, Malawi due to safety concerns

South African Airways (SAA) decided to cancel its operations into and from Blantyre Chileka International Airport, (BLZ/FWCL), Malawi due to safety concerns.

The decision was made after the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) reported finding “Level 1” safety issues at the airport.

According to the SACAA the Level 1 finding primarily relates to the inadequacy of aviation infrastructure facilities and related emergency support services offered at Chileka International Airport.
The SACAA inspection exposed several non-compliances some of which were cause for serious concern. Notably, the airport’s perimeter fence is vandalised and falls short of the set international standards. Due to lack of maintenance, both the ambulance and fire engine are not dependable.

The cancelation of SAA’s Blantyre operations became effective Saturday, 19 January 2019 and will remain in place until such time that the findings raised by the SACAA have been adequately
addressed and a follow up inspection regarding the findings has been conducted.

 

The post South African Airways stops flights to Blantyre, Malawi due to safety concerns appeared first on ASN News.

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

Aeroflot Boeing 737-800 makes emergency landing in Russia after hijack attempt

Aeroflot Boeing 737-800 makes emergency landing in Russia after hijack attempt

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

Turbine-powered Douglas DC-3 crashes near Kidron, Ohio, USA, killing two

Turbine-powered Douglas DC-3 crashes near Kidron, Ohio, USA, killing two

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

South African CAA again suspends CemAir Air Operator Certificates over safety concerns

South African CAA again suspends CemAir Air Operator Certificates over safety concerns

The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) again suspended CemAir’s Part 121 and 135 Air Operator Certificates (AOCs) on Friday, 11 January 2019.

The regulator stated there were “concerns over the systemic failure of the airline’s maintenance controls […] the most recent annual renewal audit revealed CemAir’s inability to prove the continued airworthiness of its fleet.”

CemAir’s two AOC’s had earlier been suspended on December 13, 2018.  On December 18 however, a court order lifted the suspension. A subsequent audit revealed eleven findings of which five  were classified as Level 1. CemAir then submitted a Corrective Action Plan to the CAA for 11 of the findings. The initial plan and subsequent revised versions were reviewed and found to be unacceptable. On 26 December 2018, the SACAA grounded eight of the airline’s aircraft with immediate effect.

The regulator performed additional inspections and learned that the operator could not produce sufficient evidence that maintenance recommendations made by the aircraft manufacturer were fully implemented. The CAA judged the findings to be ‘serious’ and proceeded to immediately suspend CemAir’s Part 121 and 135 AOC’s.

 

 

The post South African CAA again suspends CemAir Air Operator Certificates over safety concerns appeared first on ASN News.

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

TSB: Lithium-ion battery for e-cigarette caused fire in WestJet Boeing 737 cargo hold

TSB: Lithium-ion battery for e-cigarette caused fire in WestJet Boeing 737 cargo hold

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

DGCA India restricts long over water flights of A320neo aircraft over ongoing engine issues

DGCA India restricts long over water flights of A320neo aircraft over ongoing engine issues

The Indian Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) restricted operations of A320neo aircraft to Port Blair as a result of ongoing engine issues.

After meeting with A320neo operators GoAir and IndiGo on their ongoing issues with Pratt & Whitney PW1100G engines, DGCA issued four measures. One of these was an operational restriction of flights to Port Blair. This airport is located in the Andaman Islands between India and Thailand. Nearest airports on the Indian mainland are Kolkata at 1305 km and Chennai at 1370 km.
On December 23, 2018, an IndiGo Airbus A320neo aircraft returned to Port Blair when the pilot observed a low oil pressure warning for engine no. 2. The flight crew shut down the engine and returned to land at Port Blair.

Measures published in the Public Notice:

A. Inspection of 3rd stage LPT blade: Carry out inspection of 3rd stage LPT blades as per AMM task 72-53-00-220-801-A at every weekly inspection.

B. Dry Face Seal: Carry out BSI on No. 3 bearing front & AFT carbon seal (DFS) as per P & W special instruction 375F-18 dated 20.12.2018 at –
I. For newer engines, perform BSI at first oil filter change.
II. For engines that have already has the first oil filter change and are less than the 1000 FH of operation time, perform BSI at next opportunity or A check whichever is earlier.

C. Smoke and Odors issues :Create awareness among Cabin and Cockpit Crew about odor / burning smell/smoke (even if slightest) during approach phase and positive reporting to Cockpit crew for necessary action. If any odor/smoke is observed in Air-conditioning PACK Air, Cockpit crew need to identify the source of odor by isolating PACKs one at a time. Log all the cases detecting odours/ smoke in cabin during operation for necessary investigation and rectification. In all odour / smoke cases, engine to be inspected in detail as per AMM and to be used only after rectification of defect.

D. The restriction imposed on flight operations to Port Blair with A320 NEO aircraft.

 

 

The post DGCA India restricts long over water flights of A320neo aircraft over ongoing engine issues appeared first on ASN News.

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article

Risk of collision between DHC-8-400 and Piaggio P180 over Canada

Risk of collision between DHC-8-400 and Piaggio P180 over Canada

————

The content for this post was sourced from www.Aviation-Safety.net

View the Original Article