Cessna 525A CitationJet crashed after takeoff from Jeffersonville; fatalities reported

Cessna 525A CitationJet crashed after takeoff from Jeffersonville; fatalities reported

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Airbus A320 sheds engine fan cowl doors on departure from Las Vegas

Airbus A320 sheds engine fan cowl doors on departure from Las Vegas

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NTSC Indonesia publishes preliminary report on JT610 Boeing 737 MAX 8 accident

NTSC Indonesia publishes preliminary report on JT610 Boeing 737 MAX 8 accident

NTSC Indonesia published a preliminary report on the Lion Air B737 MAX 8 accident of October 29, showing the flight crew was struggling to maintain control after takeoff.

Lion Air flight 610 crashed into the sea shortly after takeoff from Jakarta-Soekarno-Hatta International Airport, Indonesia, killing all 189 on board.

According to the preliminary report, the Aircraft Flight Maintenance Log (AFML) recorded that since October 26 until the occurrence date several problems occurred related to airspeed and altitude flags that appeared on the captain’s (left) Primary Flight Display (PFD) on three occasions, SPEED TRIM FAIL light illumination and MACH TRIM FAIL light illumination that occurred twice.
Several attempts were made by engineers to rectify these issues. The day before the accident the Angle of Attack (AoA) sensor was replaced by engineers at Denpasar Airport.

The flight from Denpasar to Jakarta was the flight prior to JT610.  During rotation, the stick shaker activated and an IAS DISAGREE warning showed on the captain’s PFD at 400 feet. The flight was handled by the copilot as it was determined that the captain’s PFD was unreliable. The flight crew moved the STAB TRIM (stabilizer trim) switch to CUT OUT due to three automatic nosedown trim occurrences. The crew worked checklists and continued the flight to CGK.
Based on the crew’s entry in the AFML, the engineer at Jakarta flushed the left Pitot Air Data Module (ADM) and static ADM to rectify the reported IAS and ALT disagree and cleaned the electrical connector plug of the elevator feel computer.  The aircraft was subsequently released to carry out flight JT610.
During takeoff from Jakarta, the DFDR recorded a difference between left and right Angle of Attack of about 20° which continued until the end of the recording. During rotation of the aircraft, the left control column stick shaker activated and continued for most of the flight.
After the flaps were retracted, the FDR recorded automatic aircraft nose down (AND) trim for 10 seconds followed by flight crew commanded aircraft nose up (ANU) trim. Automatic AND trim briefly stopped when the flaps were temporarily extended to 5.
In their communications with air traffic control, the flight crew asked the controller to confirm the altitude of the aircraft and later also asked the speed as shown on the controller radar display. The copilot reported experiencing a “flight control problem” and that they were flying the aircraft manually.
Last radio contact was at 06:31 local time when the captain requested the arrival controller to block altitude 3,000 feet above and below for traffic avoidance. The controller asked what altitude the pilot wanted, to which the captain responded “five thou”. The controller approved the pilot request. The FDR stopped recording within twenty seconds of the pilot’s response.
More information:

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EASA extends security notice for flights over Egypt Sinai Peninsula to 27 May 2019

EASA extends security notice for flights over Egypt Sinai Peninsula to 27 May 2019

Sinai Peninsula (FAA)

Sinai Peninsula (FAA)

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) extended a security warning for the Egypt Sinai Peninsula to 27 May 2019 due to continuing concern for flight safety.

The initial EASA bulletin for Egypt was issued on November 13, 2014, and the initial version of the current bulletin CZIB-2017-09 was issued on November 27, 2017.

In the meantime, new or updated Notams have been issued by the United Kingdom, USA, Germany, and Egypt.

Most governments advise operators to avoid flying below FL250 or FL260 in this area. The Egypt Notam does not contain such a warning, but does state there may be GPS jamming around Cairo International Airport. RNAV (GNSS) approaches should not be planned at Cairo Airport

More information:

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Report: Thrust asymmetry during takeoff causes Boeing 737-800 to swerve off runway, Goa, India

Report: Thrust asymmetry during takeoff causes Boeing 737-800 to swerve off runway, Goa, India

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Report: Loss of engine oil pressure causes Metro III runway excursion on landing

Report: Loss of engine oil pressure causes Metro III runway excursion on landing

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EASA extends validity of conflict zone warning for Yemen to 23 May 2019.

EASA extends validity of conflict zone warning for Yemen to 23 May 2019.

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) extended the validity of its Conflict Zone Information Bulletin for Yemen to 23 May 2019.

  • CZIB-2017-07R3: Airspace of Yemen – Sana’a Flight Information Region

The previous extension of the warning was published on 3 September 2018 with a validity until 28 February 2019. The Bulletin references an updated German Notam, which adds the “operations by unmanned aircraft systems (UAS)” to the potential risks in the Sana’a FIR.

 

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Report: FMC entry error causes Boeing 737-800 insufficient thrust takeoff at Belfast

Report: FMC entry error causes Boeing 737-800 insufficient thrust takeoff at Belfast

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Airspace Guidance for Small UAS Operators

Understanding Airspace is something that takes a long time to be comfortable with and to be fully able to comply with the rules governing airspace.

An airspace card has just been issued that can aid you in dealing with operating in the National Airspace System (NAS).

https://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/airshow/media/UAS_Airspacecard.pdf  

 

 

Henrik Vejlstrup

412-886-2580 x206

henrik.vejlstrup@faa.gov

 

Switzerland grounds Ju-52 aircraft over severe structural damage to wing spars

Switzerland grounds Ju-52 aircraft over severe structural damage to wing spars

The Federal Office of Civil Aviation FOCA has immediately issued a temporary ban on flights for the Ju-52 Ju-Air stationed in Dübendorf. Inspection of the wreck of the Ju-52 crashed on 4 August 2018 by the Swiss Safety Investigation Board (SUST) revealed severe structural damage to the wing spars. These could not be detected during normal maintenance and inspection. According to current knowledge, however, they are not related to the crash on 4 August. The technical investigations at the SUST are not yet completed.

Following the crash of a Ju-Air Junkers Ju-52 three-engined aircraft on August 4, 2018, the airline restarted operations on August 17 with the two remaining aircraft of the same type. Since there were no indications of general technical defects at this time, the FOCA had approved the resumption of flight operations in compliance with precautionary measures. This also included that the FOCA would announce a flight ban on new findings from the ongoing safety investigations.

Meanwhile, the first results of the investigation by the Swiss TSB were published in the form of an interim report. There is still no evidence that a serious technical problem led to the accident with 20 fatalities. The investigation of the wreck, however, revealed severe structural damage in the form of cracks and corrosion on the main spar, the supporting element of the aircraft wing, and other parts of the aircraft. This damage was hidden during normal inspections and maintenance and could only be determined from the debris.

Since the two Ju-52 HB-HOP and HB-HOS stationed in Dübendorf correspond in age as well as in hours of operation to the crashed machine, it must be ensured that both aircraft do not show this damage. Until this proof has been provided or any damage has been remedied, these two Ju-52s may not be flown for the time being.

 

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